Travel Names

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Names that mean traveller, wanderer, pilgrim...


Period and Registered Forms:[edit]

English:[edit]

  • þe Siðend: [Eoswyth þe Siðend. Calontir. April 2013 LoAR] "...The appeal provided additional documentation for the construction of a noun denoting an agent derived from the present participle of a verb. As the verb in question is síðian//, according to Bosworth-Toller's Anglo-Saxon Dictionary and Wright's Old English Grammar the more likely formation would be //síðiend//. However, there is a citation of //síðen// as the verb also in Bosworth-Toller, and a quote from the Exeter Book's poem Juliana with the phrase "Ic eom engel godes ufan siþende." This is enough information to give the submitter the benefit of the doubt and to support the construction //siðend// as requested. The article, however, should be the simple demonstrative pronoun //þe//, as //þa// is the feminine accusative or plural nominative and accusative case." http:heraldry.sca.org/loar/2013/04/13-04lar.html#90
  • See also precedents below.

German:[edit]

  • Wanderer is found in Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "German Names from Nürnberg, 1497".
  • Bonaventura (roughly "good adventure"). Documentable in Germany (1584) via FamilySearch.

Hungarian:[edit]

>

Italian:[edit]

Spanish:[edit]

  • Bonaventura (roughly "good adventure"). Documentable in Spain (1568) via FamilySearch.

Sources:[edit]

Academy of St. Gabriel "Medieval Names Archive" - [[1]] Database of medieval names (from the Medieval Names Archive) - [[2]]

Laurel Name Articles - http:heraldry.sca.org/laurel/

IGI Searches, batches beginning with C, J, K, M (except M17 and M18), or P are acceptable - http:familysearch.org


Precedents:[edit]

September 2015 - the Wanderer passed:[edit]

#191Trumbrand the Wanderer. Name and device. Per fess sable and Or, in pale a tankard atop an anvil counterchanged. Previously, lingua Anglica forms of constructed English bynames like Traveler// and //Wanderer// could only be registered without the definite article //the/le: > We agree with the assessment of Pelican Emeritus. On the basis of the examples cited by her and by Batonvert, Traveler//, without the definite article, follows period patterns of descriptive bynames in English. We hereby rule that //Traveler//, or another period spelling of the term, is no longer considered SCA-compatible, but is registerable as a constructed byname (though of course we would encourage people to use one of the actually documented bynames instead of //Traveler//). While none of the commenters were able to find an explicit example of the spelling //traveler// in our period, the single //-l-//spelling is consistent with spellings found in the Middle English Dictionary s.v. travailour. We have changed the name to //Sean Traveler in order to register it. [Sean Traveler, April 2009, A-Calontir]. In the present submission, the byname the Wanderer// is a lingua Anglica form of the constructed //le Wanderare//. //Wanderare// ("one who wanders or travels about") is found as a noun dated to 1440 (Middle English Dictionary). Similar attested bynames include the 13th century //Wander// and //Wanderbug// (from the Middle English Dictionary), the 14th century //Wayfarar// (found in Jönsjö), and the 12th-13th century //(le) Pelerin// ("one who travels to a holy place, traveler from foreign lands", found in the Middle English Dictionary and Reaney & Wilson, s.n. Pilgrim). Although the more likely lingua Anglica form of the submitted byname omits the definite article //the//, Appendix A of SENA allows the registration of Middle English descriptive and occupational bynames both with and without the article //the/le//. Therefore, we overturn the precedents disallowing the use of the definite article, and allow the registration of //the Wanderer// as a lingua Anglica form of the constructed byname //le Wanderare. http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2015/09/15-09lar.html#191

April 2013 - þe Siðend passed:[edit]

#90Eoswyth þe Siðend. Name change from holding name Tiffany of Three Rivers. "...The name was also originally returned for insufficient documentation of the formation of the byname. The appeal provided additional documentation for the construction of a noun denoting an agent derived from the present participle of a verb. As the verb in question is síðian//, according to Bosworth-Toller's Anglo-Saxon Dictionary and Wright's Old English Grammar the more likely formation would be //síðiend//. However, there is a citation of //síðen// as the verb also in Bosworth-Toller, and a quote from the Exeter Book's poem Juliana with the phrase "Ic eom engel godes ufan siþende." This is enough information to give the submitter the benefit of the doubt and to support the construction //siðend// as requested. The article, however, should be the simple demonstrative pronoun //þe//, as //þa is the feminine accusative or plural nominative and accusative case." http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2013/04/13-04lar.html#90

Mar 2012 - þa Siðend returned:[edit]

#113Eowyth þa Siðend. Name Return. ... the byname is a constructed byname meaning "journeyer," but the construction is not correctly formed. As Gunnvor silfraharr said: > Since sið// is a noun meaning "journey," you can't make a present participle from it. Instead, we find //{3}esið// "travelling companion". (Bosworth-Toller, p. 878; Kärre, p. 33). Some better terms for this concept [include] //ferend// "traveller, messenger" (Bosworth-Toller, p. 282; Kärre, p. 141), //widferend//"wide-farer, far-traveller" (Kärre, p. 141), //lida// "traveller" (Bosworth-Toller, p. 638), //liðend// "wayfarer" (Bosworth-Toller, p. 644), //we{3}farend//"wayfarer" (Bosworth-Toller, p. 1184; Kärre, p. 145), and //woriend "wanderer, vagabond" (Bosworth-Toller, p. 1266; Kärre, p. 190). [[3]]

March 2011 - Eardstapa returned:[edit]

#176Donnchad Eardstapa. Name and device. Azure, in pale an axe fesswise head to sinister and a drinking horn fesswise argent. The byname was constructed from a word that appears in use only in a poetic context. Without evidence that bynames were created from poetic terms in Anglo-Saxon or that the term eardstapa was used more generally, we cannot register it as a byname. http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2011/03/11-03lar.html

May 2009 - No More SCA-Compatibility:[edit]

On the May 2008 Cover Letter, we ruled: > Therefore, as of the May 2009 decisions meetings, we declare that no new name elements or name patterns will be ruled SCA-compatible, that all names previously ruled SCA-compatible are no longer SCA-compatible and that in order for them to be registered, documentation meeting the same standards as for non-SCA-compatible names will be required. This ruling went into effect with this, the May 2009 Pelican meeting. [[4]]

April 2009 - Traveler documented, not just SCA compatible:[edit]

Sean Traveler. Name. Submitted as Sean the Traveler//, the name was two steps from period practice, one for combining Gaelic and English in the same name, and another for the use of the SCA-compatible byname //the Traveler//. Concerning the byname //the Traveler, Pelican Emeritus argues: > The original precedent, set for <The Wanderer> in 12/1995 says only "[registering Johan Gregor the Wanderer] Contrary to the assertion in the LoI, the Wanderer is not a standard English byname; it is a standard SCA byname for which no period citation has yet been found. (Talan Gwynek, LoAR December 1995, p. 8): The precedent concerning <The Traveller>, springs like Athena full-grown from the head of <the Wanderer> in 10/2001, when we find "No evidence has been found that the bynames the Wanderer or the Traveler were used in English in period. However, they are both SCA compatible. Though the correct modern spelling is Traveler, the spelling that has been registered most often is Traveller. Therefore, this byname is registerable in both the spelling the Traveler and the Traveller. [Mihrimah the Traveler, 10/01, R-Ansteorra, returned for two weirdnesses]" > So, it appears, then, that <the wanderer> and <the traveller> are not registerable as English bynames because we have no example of them as English bynames. However, this is a much stricter standard than the RfS supplies. Ideally, yes, words used as bynames should be found as bynames. But the rules (specifically 2.II) also assert (emphasis mine) "Documented names and words// may be used to form place names, patronymics, //epithets//, and other names //in a period manner. > So, the question then is not "was the traveller ever used as an English byname in period" but rather "Was the meaning and usage of the traveller such in period that it is consistent with epithets found in England in period?" I believe the answer is yes, it is. First, the word is definately [sic] applied specifically to humans (and to specific people and/or classes of people). The OED s.v. Traveller gives these examples under "a person..going from place to place..a wayfarer, a passenger" 'c1375 Sc. Leg. Saints xxv. (Julian) 20 Sic hope in-to sancte Iulyane e traualouris ane had tane. c1475 Rauf Coilear 82 Fyre, drink, nor meit, Nor nane vther eismentis for trauellouris behufe. 1552 ABP. HAMILTON Catech. (1884) 51 Certane travelars will nocht begin thair jornay on the satterday. a1591 H. SMITH Serm. (1637) 327 A traveller passeth from towne unto towne, untill he come to his Inne'. > Under the definition of one who travels abroad or to foreign places, there is "1556 ROBINSON tr. More's Utop., P. Giles to Buslyde (1895) p. xcvi, The very famous and renowmed trauailer Vlysses". In fact, the only reference in the OED that is not to a human in period is this one -- "1597 GERARDE Herbal II. cccxi. 739 Decking and adorning waies and hedges, where people trauell, and thereupon I haue named it the *Traueilers Ioie. 1678 PHILLIPS (ed. 4), Travailours-joy, a sort of Herb called in Latin Clematis." -- which gives a folk name to a plant after a human occupation or pursuit. > Certainly the similar "wayfarer" seems a reasonable byname; especially paired in this quotation with bynames for various other lowlife characters: "1514 BARCLAY Eglog iii. (1570) Bvjb, Iugglers and pipers, and scuruy wayfarers." > In addition, the OED notes traveller as a "noun agent + -er", with a crossref to -er (2), which says " 2. ME. -er, a. AF. -er (OF. -ier) in ns. which descend from L. forms in -rius, -rium (see -ARY), or which were formed in Fr. after the analogy of those so descending. Where the L. type of the suffix is the masc. -rius, it has usually the sense 'a person connected with', and the words are designations of office or occupation, as butler, carpenter, draper, grocer, mariner, officer. (So also in a few ME. adoptions of OF. fem. ns. in -iere:L. -ria, as chamberer, lavender.) Where the suffix represents the L. neuter -rium, the sense is 'a thing connected with', 'a receptacle for', as in antiphoner, danger, garner, etc." > So, Traveller is a descriptive word applied exclusively to humans in period, from at least the 14th C, formed in the manner of other descriptive bynames -- so, why is this epithet SCA-compatible, rather than just registerable under 2.II? I think it should be just a registerable, constructed byname. Batonvert provides examples of documented bynames with similar meanings: > And to these citations from the OED, let us add actual period bynames: Alice Wayfarar//, 1394, and Emma //Weyfare//, 1327 (Jönsjö, //Middle English Nicknames//, pp.185-6); and Robert //Peregrine "traveler from foreign lands", 1243 (Reaney & Wilson 351, s.n. Pilgrim). > Petr. Wydefare//, 1279; and Ad. //Rideway// "ride away", 1218 (Jönsjö, op.cit, pp.190, 151). There are also multiple examples of some form of //Romfare//, referring to pilgrims to Rome. All of these support the concept of a traveler as a period byname... though I note they seem to be concentrated in the time period when such travel would be a distinguishing feature //worthy of a byname. We agree with the assessment of Pelican Emeritus. On the basis of the examples cited by her and by Batonvert, Traveler//, without the definite article, follows period patterns of descriptive bynames in English. We hereby rule that //Traveler//, or another period spelling of the term, is no longer considered SCA-compatible, but is registerable as a constructed byname (though of course we would encourage people to use one of the actually documented bynames instead of //Traveler//). While none of the commenters were able to find an explicit example of the spelling //traveler// in our period, the single //-l-// spelling is consistent with spellings found in the //Middle English Dictionary// s.v. travailour. We have changed the name to //Sean_Traveler in order to register it. This has just one step from period practice, for combining Gaelic and English. [[5]]


Compiled Name Precedents:[edit]

François la Flamme 2002.08 This name combines an Italian given name with an SCA compatible English byname. Combining an Italian given name and an English byname in the same name is registerable, though it is a weirdness. However, this name contains a second weirdness for use of an SCA compatible element (the Traveler). As the name has two weirdness, it is not registerable. [Nuzzio the Traveler, 08/2002, R-Meridies]
François la Flamme 2001.10 No evidence has been found that the bynames the Wanderer// or //the Traveler// were used in English in period. However, they are both SCA compatible. Though the correct modern spelling is //Traveler//, the spelling that has been registered most often is //Traveller//. Therefore, this byname is registerable in both the spelling //the Traveler// and //the Traveller//. [Mihrimah the Traveler, [[6]], R-Ansteorra, //returned for two weirdnesses]


François la Flamme 2003.04 The submitter requested an authentic name for 14th to 16th C Polish with the meaning 'John the elder, who travels'. [...]
Nebuly found information information regarding the elements in this name:
> [...] The word podró{z dot above}nika// is the feminine form of //podró{z dot above}nik//, and so is grammatically out of place in an otherwise masculine name. I can find no evidence that this was a period byname, and think it unlikely a person would be known by two descriptive bynames. The only byname I've found with the submitter's intended meaning is //Wandrownyk// (SSNO, s.n. //W{e,}drownik), but again I think the name "The older John, the wanderer" is unlikely for having two descriptive bynames.
This name would be registerable as Jan Starszy// 'John the elder' or as //Jan Wandrownyk 'John the wanderer'. However, both of these options are major changes. As the submitter did not allow major changes, we must return this name. [Jan Starszy Podró{z.}nika, 04/2003 LoAR, R-East]
François la Flamme 2002.09 Submitted as Agnieszka the Wanderer, the submitter requested authenticity for 13th C Polish. Nebuly found information about period forms of this name:
> The submitted spelling Agnieszka// is the standard modern spelling for that name in Polish. It is my experience working with the SSNO that soft consonants were not indicated in period spellings (there wouldn't be an //i// after //n// in the name), and this is supported by the spellings in the SSNO: //Agnesca//,//Agneschka//, //Agneszka//. Since the client asks for a 13th century name, I'd recommend changing the given name to //Agneszka.
> The byname the Wanderer// is ruled SCA-compatible, and there is a period Polish equivalent. The Polish for "wanderer" is //wêndrownik//, which appears under that heading in the SSNO in the name //Stanek Wandrownyk, dated 1397.
> The name is registerable as submitted, but if the client would likea fully authentic Polish name, the period feminine equivalent would be Agneszka Wandrownyka.
We have changed the given name to the form recommended by Nebuly in order to register this name and to partially meet the submitter's request for authenticity. As she only allowed minor changes, and changing the language of the byname from the English the Wanderer// to the Polish //Wandrownyka// is a major change, we were unable to change the name to the completely Polish form recommended by Nebuly. The byname //the Wandereris a Lingua Anglica translation of the Polish byname found by Nebuly and therefore does not count as a weirdness. [Agneszka the Wanderer, 09/2002 LoAR, A-Meridies]
François la Flamme 2001.12 The byname the Wanderer is SCA compatible. This name has one weirdness for use of an SCA-compatible name phrase. Since the entire name is English, there is no additional weirdness for lingual mix and this name is registerable. [Joel the Wanderer, [[7]], A-Artemisia]
François la Flamme 2001.10 No evidence has been found that the bynames the Wanderer// or //the Traveler// were used in English in period. However, they are both SCA compatible. Though the correct modern spelling is //Traveler//, the spelling that has been registered most often is //Traveller//. Therefore, this byname is registerable in both the spelling //the Traveler//and //the Traveller//. [Mihrimah the Traveler, [[8]], R-Ansteorra, //returned for two weirdnesses]
Elsbeth Anne Roth 2001.07 [the Wanderer//] She requested an authentic English name. However, the name is not authentic, as it combines a Gaelic given name with an SCA compatible byname. [Morag the Wanderer, 07/01, A-Artemisia]
Da'ud ibn Auda (2nd tenure, 2nd year) 1996.05 [Wanderer] The byname, for all its enormous popularity in the SCA, remains unattested in English. (Talan Gwynek, LoAR May 1996, p. 5)
Da'ud ibn Auda (2nd tenure, 2nd year) 1995.12 [registering Johan Gregor the Wanderer] Contrary to the assertion in the LoI, the Wanderer is not a standard English byname; it is a standard SCA byname for which no period citation has yet been found. (Talan Gwynek, LoAR December 1995, p. 8)
[[9]]